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6 reasons why you should attend #AMAconf

Still deciding whether to attend this year’s AMA conference — The Value of Everything? Whether you’re an AMA conference newbie or loyal attendee, we’d love to see you in Belfast 25-27 July. Here are our top reasons to join us there:

Conference 2015 Keynotes

 

 

 

 

1. Develop networks for the future
With 600+ arts, culture and heritage professionals attending, you’ll get the chance to connect and share experiences with people like you. Download the latest delegate list

2. Be inspired by thought leaders
Hear from a range of speakers who will share their audience-focused work and inspiring case studies. You’ll also get the chance to ask your burning questions. See the speaker line-up

3. Enjoy a varied programme
You can take part in a mix of keynotes, vibrant discussions, tailored workshops and one-to-ones. Explore the programme

4. Explore the historic city of Belfast
Experience Belfast’s vibrant cultural scene through organised group tours and socials or stay on for the weekend to explore the sights yourself.

5. Leave brimming with new ideas
You’ll return to the office with a new outlook and fresh approaches to share with your team.

6. Access additional content
You’ll get the chance to relive your AMA conference experience by accessing add-on content such as speaker presentations, video recordings and guest blog posts.

Need more convincing? Hear from some of our members  in these short videos who share why they attend AMA conference and what they enjoy the most.

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Speaker Spot: Claire Tomley #AMAcopywriting

Claire Tomley, Marketing Manager at Imperial War Museums, is speaking at Copywriting Day 2017 — Narrative Matters on Wednesday 1 March. In this Speaker Spot she gives you a flavour of her session:


To me, a good story includes…
a strong hook, point of reference and the ability to create a visual – strike the balance of these three elements and you have the power to evoke an emotional response. 

My session at Copywriting Day 2017 is about…
the power of storytelling as an effective marketing tool.
 

I want to share my story because…
a challenging ‘product’ to market can result in a creative outcome.

You’ll come away from my session with…
insight, and hopefully inspiration.

What I’m most looking forward to about the day is…
the opportunity to share ideas and learn from kindred marketers.

Find out more about Claire’s session and book your place for Copywriting Day 2017 — Narrative Matters.

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Speaker Spot: Ryan Brown #AMAcopywriting

Ryan Brown, Productions and Social Media Marketing Officer at the Royal Shakespeare Company, is speaking at Copywriting Day 2017 — Narrative Matters on Wednesday 1 March. In this Speaker Spot he gives you a flavour of his session:


To me, a good story includes…
a beginning, middle and an end.

I want to share my story because…
social media has become a huge part of our marketing world and we should be looking at different ways to explore and expand our knowledge of this medium through anyway we can.

You’ll come away from my session with…
examples on how we were able to run a sub campaign on social media to generate user based content for marketing purposes.

What I’m most looking forward to about the day is…
the ability to listen and share with a wide range of Arts Marketing professionals on their experiences of using tailored copy and content to a wide variety of audiences.

Find out more about Ryan’s session and book your place for Copywriting Day 2017 — Narrative Matters.

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Speaker Spot: Kathryn Winter #AMAcopywriting

Kathryn Winter, Head of Digital at the Cogency, is speaking at Copywriting Day 2017 — Narrative Matters on Wednesday 1 March. In this Speaker Spot she gives you a flavour of her session:


To me, a good story includes…
A structure that gives the audience the freedom to decide how they want to react to it. Visual stimulus is an impactful way to create that structure. The audience may identify, empathise, appreciate or even disagree with the story but it will allow an honest and trustworthy response.

My session at Copywriting Day 2017 is about…

  • How visual content can be planned in advance and used to tell your story.
  • How to use social influencers to increase reach within your target audiences.
  • How to create a synchronised moment with partners and influencers.

I want to share my story because…
The artwork ‘We’re here because we’re here’ made a war that took place 100 years ago emotionally relevant to today’s society.  The lessons learnt during the development and implementation has since informed other projects.

You’ll come away from my session with…

  • Ways to harness the power of social conversation by planning written copy, imagery and film footage that can be applied to any budget.
  • What to look for in a social influencer.

What I’m most looking forward to about the day is…
Listening to a variety of projects and case studies that will inspire me to try different approaches in the future. Shared insights can be incredibly useful when working with small budgets that don’t give you the opportunity to experiment.

Find out more about Kathryn’s session and book your place for Copywriting Day 2017 — Narrative Matters.

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Speaker Spot: Neon Kelly and Paul Willoughby #AMAcopywriting

Paul Willoughby, Co-founder and Executive Creative Director, and Neon Kelly, Senior Content Editor, at Human After All are speaking at Copywriting Day 2017 — Narrative Matters on Wednesday 1 March. In this Speaker Spot they give us a flavour of their session:

To us, a good story includes…
Seeds of thoughts that emotionally resonate, helping you look at your own life and work through new eyes.

Our session at Copywriting Day 2017 is about…
Key insights and from our three-year collaboration with BAFTA, followed by an exploration of the future of narrative and human-centred storytelling in marketing.

We want to share my story because…
We developed a great relationship with BAFTA over the course of three years’ FIlm, TV and Craft awards campaigns. We were uniquely positioned to convey the story of their brand to key audiences both above-the-line, through social media, and through all physical touchpoints on awards nights. This collaboration speaks to a way of approaching communications that we believe offers great value.

You’ll come away from our session with…
Ideas and tactics for working with a prestigious organisation, as well as a sense of trends in storytelling and marketing.

What we’re most looking forward to about the day is…
Learning from other stories, and applying those insights to our work.

Find out more about Paul and Neon’s session and book your place for Copywriting Day 2017 — Narrative Matters.

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Work, work, work, work, work, work! #ADA

Cat JohnMarketing and Communications Manager at Watershed in Bristol has been finding that in order to make a difference, you have to work!

Here at Watershed we’ve been working hard to get to know our audiences better – and taking part in the Audience Diversity Academy has shown me just how much more work there is to do. Increasing diversity in both our audiences and workforce involves consistent on-going work – and is not something that can be fixed magically overnight.

Our first ADA experiment in October centred on an opportunity we run for young people – the British Film Institute’s Film Academy, which is part of a national scheme to encourage 16-19 year olds to get a foothold in the film industry.

Our aim with this experiment was to encourage applications from two different under represented groups – young people from BAME backgrounds and young people from low income backgrounds. We recognise that these are two distinct groups with different needs.

To reach our goal we did two central things – we reviewed and updated our marketing materials and online content, and we also simplified the application process. We worked as a cross-departmental in-house team on this experiment – with input from comms, web development, content creators and engagement teams.

Firstly, our Film Academy website was refreshed to include fresh video content – which is an obvious step for a project about film and the ‘moving image’! We feel this helped to make the site much more dynamic and compelling to a younger demographic.

Another aspect of the refresh was for us to review the language used on the website – we asked some young people what they thought, and they felt the tone was a bit too ‘academic’ – so we updated it to make it feel more ‘fun’ and less like school. We changed the visuals too – we searched for more diverse images of past Film Academy participants and used these instead – both online and in the print flyer.

My mentor Sara Devine was very insightful with her advice and it was great to subsequently meet her in person at the Digital Marketing day in London in December. I talked to her about our initial ideas and she helpfully suggested undertaking longer term work in different communities which we are also doing, although there wasn’t enough time to make significant progress for this round.

We’ve just done the number crunching on the stats for our BFI Film Academy – we saw applications from non-white British applicants increase from 14.1% to 26% and applications from people who have received free school meals increase from 11.7% to 18%.

In total, we received a massive 135 applications this year, with 128 equal ops responses collected. Last year (2015) we had 47 applications, so the increase is very encouraging. Comparing this to the general Bristol population, the percentage of non-white people in Bristol is 22% and 23% of young people receive free school meals.

Looking back, we think that perhaps this time we inadvertently made the application form a bit too simple, meaning that the interview panel had a tougher task to select applicants, based on far less information. So this needs some fine-tuning – we need to keep the process accessible yet also ask for all the information we need.

Also running concurrently through the Autumn was the BFI Black Star blockbuster season with plenty of scope for attracting more diverse audiences.

I found it so helpful to be already working within an organisation that is signed up to the case for diversity – for the past two years we have hosted the ACE No Boundaries conference, which has already helped focused our minds. So I didn’t have to fight any internal battles, which was heartening – but we all know there’s more work to do.

 

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